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In his apocalyptic vision, a seemingly naive concept of paradise mutates into a horror scenario in a video-game aesthetic derived from the imagery of cult artist Henry Darger. A glass coffin, porcelain chrysanthemums and a live performance recorded in the same room complete the opera-inspired, fairytale-like scenario.

Cheese and Dough by Mika Rottenberg are being shown together for the first time. The main protagonists are six sisters with long, Rapunzel-like tresses who have magic powers and can make cheese with their hair. Using poetic imagery, Rottenberg repeats the production processes ad absurdum, incorporating the female body as a dynamic part of these processes and transporting viewers into a world that is at once comfortably familiar and bizarre.

Size: 21,70 x 27,70 cm. Linen binding. Published by Hatje Cantz Verlag, Ostfildern. It focuses on corporeality in videos, installations and photography, an aspect of art that has been explored intensively since the s and s, in particular within the genres of Body Art and Performance. The book and the exhibition shed light on the themes of self-dramatisation, pain, transformation and physicality in the sense of a plasticity that can be experienced as a real, external phenomenon. It also features an article contributed by respected art scholar Elisabeth Bronfen.

The volume thus constitutes an informative work on a theme central to the art of the past 50 years. The collection has found a new home in the former production facilities of the Conzen frame factory. The building, which celebrates its centenary this year, was redeveloped from top to toe by the architectural firm Kuehn Malvezzi to meet the particular requirements of the collection. A large opening connects the two main exhibition rooms and a delicate stairway leads up to the spacious attic floor and roof deck, 23 metres above the ground.

The way up and down is the key to the whole design — a building that is less an object to look at than a path to follow. It leads through dark and light spaces, from the little cinema on the ground floor, on through two different exhibition storeys and up to the top floor with its metre ceiling. It is remarkable to see how, even at the very zenith of the feminist movement, women were still being stereotyped as helpless creatures.

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The pieces on show centre on extreme spatial, psychological and interpersonal situations. The two exhibition floors are also subdivided according to different questions and themes, both to highlight individual aspects of the works and open up the exhibition as a whole to explore further issues. Examples of works that centre on the destruction of interiors and structures are Shades of Destructors by Mark Leckey and Hammering Out an old argument by Monica Bonvicini. There is something profoundly unsettling and disturbing surrounding the act of destruction in the pieces by Robert Boyd and Adam McEwen.

In the four-channel video installation Xanadu , Boyd focused on the self-destructive impulses that characterise our society by condensing different elements of mass culture like news bites, documentaries, comics and pop music videos into a sequence of split-second images. The brutal and random interfaces reflect the media world we live in, where the boundaries between entertainment, information and horror have been virtually erased. The seemingly incongruous stories of different people, which move the protagonists through various interiors and urban landscapes, are projected onto three translucent screens.

The works of Anthony Burdin heighten this feeling of disorientation; the protagonist in his Desert Mix leads spectators through a series of bizarre places. McCall uses a 16mm film projector to direct light at a black surface; with the help of a smoke machine, the beam gradually becomes visible as a perfect cone of light.

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The space and the projection itself become a kind of sculpture that breaks down the traditional relationship between cinema viewers and the film projector. Foreword by Julia Stoschek. Size: 21,80 x 27,50 cm. The volume documents the exhibition and its extraordinary backdrop. Over the course of the exhibition, the silkworms undergo a slow material metamorphosis, feeding, defecating, and spinning silk cocoons inside which they resurface their bodies. This transformation is captured by three cameras and livestreamed on the gallery walls.

The live video feedback loop creates a disorienting shift between the material presence of the work and its mediated image. Locating these dragon gates as portals for formal and ideological therianthropy shapeshifting in the film, the narrator embarks on a sprawling sociopolitical critique of gender, cinema, and Western thought. Presented as the final installment in this body of work, this piece is both a place of arrival and a site of disappearance, a presence and an absence. Consisting of woven fragments of translucent LED screens used for skyline advertisements, the work is installed in a way that the ideal viewing distance lies inches beyond the gallery walls, situating the onscreen images at the edge of perception.

As one approaches, both image and object begin to dematerialize, entrapping the viewer in a state between cathexis and abstraction. Melgaard compares the experience to taking Dimethyltryptamine DMT , a naturally occurring drug, which is produced by a gland in the brain. DMT is considered the strongest hallucinogenic chemical substance and is found in almost every living organism on earth. The artist is raising the contradictory view that if we are to continue to exist, humans will have to cease to procreate, as a result of the carbon impact of producing new human life.

My Trip also explores the abyss of the technological underground, the endless information consumed every day and the feeling of apathy and dullness that this technology consequently produces. Dealing with the dark side of humanity, it often discusses, investigates and pushes the boundaries of societal acceptance. Melgaard has had more than forty-five solo exhibitions in leading galleries around the world. His work has been seen in numerous group shows and at international art fairs; he is a frequent curator and collaborator, has written more than a dozen novels, and produced seven films.

He has twice participated in the Biennale de Lyon. In , Melgaard participated in The Whitney Biennial and in January Melgaard was the focus of the first of six important exhibitions at the Munch Museum in Oslo. Since the early s, Koo Jeong A has made works that are seemingly casual and commonplace, yet at the same time remarkably precise, deliberate, and considered. Her reflections on the senses and the body incorporate objects, still and moving images, audio elements, and aromas.

Many of her works are conceived within site-specific environments that question the limits of fact and fiction, the imaginary and actuality of our world. Koo considers the connection of energies between a place and people, relying on chance to drive her encounters. A curatorial laboratory and research hub, Acute Art are committed to finding new ways to take digital artwork to the public, both physically, through exhibitions, and as a curated offer on the Acute Art website and free app. Since the late s, Stan Douglas has been creating films, photographs, and installations, as well as recently venturing into theater productions and other multidisciplinary projects, exploring the parameters of their respective mediums.

The artist queries the past in his works, breaking through traditional narrative structures to blur fact and fiction.

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The works on display reconstruct and reimagine the s and 70s, centering on de colonization, migration, jazz, underground disco, and Afrobeat. On view are the early two-channel video installation Hors-champs , the six-hour video Luanda-Kinshasa , as well as large-format photographs from the series Disco Angola The artist shot Luanda-Kinshasa in a space modelled on the legendary New York recording studio The Church, while Hors-champs was filmed in a Parisian television studio.

It is not only the meticulous staging during the filming and photography process, but above all rigorous construction in the editing room, which effortlessly transports the viewer through space and time. Stan Douglas is widely regarded as one of the most important representatives of time-based media art. His works are again being shown in a solo exhibition in Berlin for the first time since Clad as a sci-fi documentary about daily life on the Caps, an island in the middle of the Atlantic where illegal migrants are detained, the work amplifies reality through magical realism and humor.

The Siblings Compendium is a collective research document inspired by writers and thinkers including Ursula K. In SUBTEXT, Self presents an imaginary stage beneath the opera of Siblings, having agents perform and recount the research in simultaneity, through recitation, song, and games. By including various stages and objects from their films in the gallery, the boundaries between the representational space of the film and the actual space of the gallery begin to dissolve. These on- and off-screen human and non-human encounters examine the limits of musical and filmic forms as protest and resistance, calling for an urgently desired future.

The piece comprises two parallel videos that use allegory and animation to think about progress. Through intricate drawings in ink and pencil, speckled clay, and encrusted plasticine, Crewe reflects upon the evolution of mythic narratives, inter- personal change, and collective political time. In its double telling, Pastoral Drama envisions the collapse of mythic pasts with the dangerous after-world of the present. The filmmaker tersely distills material shot on the eve of the 45th presidential inauguration in January and blends moments of perilous public authority with more intimate scenes and tender portraits.

The film uses poetry as a means to reckon with the present, and casts the figure of the poet as a guide in times of chaos. Ian Cheng creates live simulations that explore the nature of mutation and our capacity to relate to change. Drawing on principles of video game design and cognitive science, the simulations are populated with characters programmed with behavioral drives, but left to self-evolve amidst otherworldly environmental conditions.

It is composed of three interconnected episodes, each centered on the life of a narrative agent — the Emissary — who attempts to achieve a series of narrative goals, only to be disrupted by the underlying simulation and deviate into new directions. Across three decades, Jafa has developed a dynamic, multidisciplinary practice ranging from films and installations to lecture-performances and happenings that tackle, challenge and question prevailing cultural assumptions about identity and race.

By re-performing these narratives in the present, Jafa imagines and constructs new possibilities for making them visible. Jafa creates work that approximates the radical alienation of Black life in the West while seeking to make visible — or emancipate — the power embedded in modes of African expression.

Texts by Fred Moten, Tina M. The artist has been collecting and working from a set of source books since the s, seeking to trace and map unwritten histories and narratives relating to black life. Between and a young naturalist, Alexander von Humboldt — , visited the American continent for the first time, making two expeditions.

The most adventurous section of his journey was the trip down the Orinoco to the Rio Negro in Venezuela. At the time, his report on this journey laid the foundations for a holistic way of looking at nature — one that was way ahead of its time. Von Humboldt was the first researcher to point out how the forces of nature, both animate and inanimate, work together. Starting with the idea of the kind of ecology that focuses not only on natural circumstances but also on the economic and socio-political situation, as well as on technological progress, the exhibition investigated an alternative interpretation of anthropology and zoology.

Accordingly, the selection of works evidenced the search for our evolutionary roots, looking into questions of indigeneity, of hybrids and synthetic forms of life, the migration of the species, and that of our constantly changing perceptions of reality due to all kinds of different influences. The different complexes of subjects move within that intermediate space between nature and art, their various systems offering new approaches to interpretation and methods of classification.

A free magazine accompanied the exhibition, which is here as download available. Nothing is left to chance at the Institute for Cybernetics and Future Research. Ostensibly for research purposes, a private corporation uses a mainframe to create a computer-animated world where economic and social developments can be simulated in order to make forecasts and thus lay the basis for decision-making. This mainframe goes by the name of Simulacron 1 and is capable of perfectly simulating a section of reality with all the respective inhabitants.

All the simulated persons have their own minds, but no idea that they are part of a virtual reality. By means of the virtual animated real-time simulations that arise through the 3D videogame design Cheng enables viewers to experience the microscopic but essential mechanisms of the complex, multi- millennia-long process of evolution.

The structure of consumer and product experiences in capitalist societies and the creative industries become the main theme of art. The narratives overlap with one another, reveal different angles on death, and morph into a kind of deja-vu in the viewer. The works in the exhibition shared in common a critical thrust that asks how digital technology should be limited and justified.

In this regard, the individual art forms oscillate between the different genres. They radically cast into question traditional notions of the artwork and the original creation of pictures as the main task of art. A free exhibition magazine accompanied the exhibition with an essay by Hannah Black and introductory texts on the individual works, which can be downloaded here.

The exhibition brings together works in film and video by seventeen artists, spanning over six decades of audiovisual production focused on themes such as cultural history, race, gender identity, circulation of images in the media, and the role of artists in contemporary society. Self-representation and its strategies, such as self-portrait and the fictionalization of life, emerge in various works, functioning as a potential guiding thread and uniting productions in the exhibition, as well as appropriation, collection, and montage of images from other sources.

These are two possible thematic trends running through the exhibit, serving as useful conceptual cores to navigate it, but which do not exhaust the possibilities of interpreting the works displayed and the relationships between them. Time kills simply by passing, and there is nothing we can do about that or the veracity of the phrase. Nevertheless, it serves to activate other senses in the context of the exhibition. Time-based art relates to works of art produced in video, film, audio, or computerized technologies that unfold to viewers over time, with duration rather than space as their main dimension, unlike painting and sculpture although duration is also an element of those two- or three-dimensional art forms.

To collect time-based artworks, one must compress time in analog and digital media. Therefore, exhibiting them requires decompressing those time frames and creating different forms of spatialization, generating displaysof different lengths occurring simultaneously in a group show. In the case of this exhibit, adding up to ten hours, thirty-one and forty seconds which viewers break down and recombine at will. Historically, the development of video as an art form occurs in tandem with the spread of the electronic image and its interlacing with everyday life, irreversibly altering our perception of time and space.

Even more so in a context in which it is continuously changing, making us anxious to keep up and directly influencing the way capitalism affects our consumer desires and drives. The virtualization of our world experience and increasing temporal hence subjective compression are the context the artists must deal with to create their work. Thus, time not only kills passively, it kills a little more every second. The exhibition comprises three halls for large-scale installations on the fifth floor displaying works by Arthur Jafa, Rachel Rose, and Monica Bonvicini, immersive spaces that offer time-based experiences isolated from their surroundings.

Around these spaces, in the circulation areas, other works establish new relationships with one another. In twin rooms, Hito Steyerl and Ryan Gander investigate the potential of their own images as material for the creation of their works. The works by Ulay and Lutz Bacher deal respectively with stolen paintings and appropriated photographs, lending new meaning to icons of art history and mass culture. On the sixth floor, works by Douglas Gordon and Cyprien Gaillard are screened in a kind of diptych, referring to the landscape of corporate architecture around the building and revisiting the narcissistic role of images in the construction of urban icons.

Manipulation of time is one of the features used by the artists to deal with images, from recording to screening, including, naturally, editing. The curator who exhibits these works enjoys the same prerogative when positioning them in space — and in time. The exhibition constituted the largest presentation of time-based media works in Israel. As a whole, the collection centers contemporaneity as an active engagement with the here and now.

True to this emphasis, this exhibition focuses on the contemporary part of the collection. The works featured in TURN ON were created in the last decade, in which technology-based media have developed at a dizzying speed. This is reflected in an astonishing variety of media-based art, showcased in the exhibition via 22 works by 17 artists. These range from performative and theatrical elements in the works to different means of narration.

More than half of the artists featured in the exhibition are women. This female presence introduces into the exhibition aspects concerning gender, sexuality, and female identity, while accentuating the existential questions underlying the works in the exhibition as a whole. Implicit subtexts of power struggles — between the sexes, between the individual and society, and between different creative traditions — are present throughout, resulting in an exhibition that is contemplative, seductive and reflective.

The works were displayed as installations that relate to the museum space as a sculptural sphere, presenting the video projections as distinct artistic experiences composed of image, movement, sound, space, and time. They present and reflect incommensurability and simultaneity as characteristics of our time, as well as revealing a museum space that accommodates itself to the unique qualities of the projected medium. It is to date the most extensive presentation of time-based art in Israel.

The exhibition title derives from TURN ON, an artwork by Adrian Paci made in , and allows countless different levels of association: switch on, trigger, provoke, and a physical turn-on. It also gives a glimpse of some imagined scenarios of our future. The work presented in the project has been produced since the turn of the last millennium and spans from seminal contemporary classics to very recent productions.

A further chapter will thereafter be presented at Moderna Museet in Stockholm There will be works that explore the growing xenophobia, extremism and religious fundamentalism of our time, and others that remind us of the colonial past and how it continues to affect the way we live together as humans today.

A number of works in this chapter seem to point towards a shift—perhaps a devolution of mankind, or a transformation into something new. We here enter worlds in which the semantic order seems to implode and we find that language no longer connects to what we see. Known categories dissolve and disparate objects and materials seem to fuse and melt into one another. New amalgamations are being formed and a future human existence appears fundamentally uncertain. With large-format video works and films as well as multi-channel installations, the exhibition demonstrates conclusively how video art as an artistic medium has lost none of its power in the 50 years of its existence.

Clouds of smoke that rise up from the friction slowly blur the scene. In this creative, high-powered performance a destructive act melds with creative violence to form a threatening contradiction, with man and machine coming up against their limits to the point of complete disappearance. Painting, sculpture and sound are quite radically manifested in this admixture of roaring high speed and groaning standstill.

With this extraordinary exhibition, the ZKM is continuing its tradition of major panoramic shows on video art. As this book demonstrates, video art, which first emerged five decades ago, has lost none of its vitality. By focusing on engagement with the contemporary world, the collection seeks to create a panorama of social and cultural tendencies. The conceptual structure of the exhibition concentrates on media art from the beginning of the s to the present. As of 16 April across a total space of over 2, sq. The exhibition will focus on pieces on film and video, as is the case for the entire Julia Stoschek Collection.

They are rounded out by sculptures e. The exhibition takes up the Deichtorhallen tradition of presenting major collections. In this case, the collection is one of the most important sets of media-influenced art in Germany, something no doubt related to the age of the collector At the same time, the show links back to the Fire, Earth, Water, Air exhibition, organized at the Deichtorhallen in as part of the Mediale and the first display of media-influenced art at the Deichtorhallen.

Edited by Dirk Luckow. Foreword by Dirk Luckow. Interview with Julia Stoschek by Dirk Luckow. From 16 April till 25 July , works by over 50 artists from this very young private collection will be on display in the Deichtorhallen in Hamburg on a total space of over 2, sq. Andreas Gursky is known across the globe for his monumental photography in which he reconstructs reality using digitally manipulated images.

Christiane Fochtmann, Andreas Bunte, Manuel Graf, Andreas Korte, Bianca Voss and Jan Wagner develop artistic positions that address the history of art and culture, everyday events and poetry in the media of film and music. The presentation of their works is in interesting contrast to the architecture of the KIT. With reference to the exterior of the KIT, it shows the seagulls that swarm past on the banks of the Rhine, plummeting greedily to earth to snap up the food the artist has strewn.

Christiane Fochtmann plays with a humorous interaction between image and sound. The work Flower Power , for example, shows flower buds opening and closing in fast motion to the sound of snoring. The Driver by Andreas Korte plays inside a parking building. A person facing away from the viewer is moving towards the exit.

Camerawork and distorted sounds create an atmosphere of primeval fear, turning the viewer into an involuntary pursuer. The 16mm, black-and-white film has the aesthetic quality of the silent films from the beginnings of cinematic history. Persistent ideas and the universality of the language of architecture are the themes in the work of Manuel Graf. A wild, colourful pictorial history of architecture begins to the rhythm of the music. In addition, small lines of text irritate the eye. Andreas Korte and Christiane Fochtmann will also each be presenting a new work, and five further artists are showing their works in a film programme in the KIT Blackbox.

How to find us. Advance registration for the visit during the opening hours is not required. Public guided tours in German through the current exhibitions take place twice a month on Sundays, noon and p. Free of charge for children and young people under eighteen, as well as school children, students and trainees. If you are interested in booking a guided tour in English, please send us an e-mail to visit. If you would like to use the lift to travel between the floors of the exhibition space, just ask our service staff and they will be happy to assist you.

The distinctive nature of the collection carries over into the space in which it is exhibited. Between the cinema room in the basement and the roof terrace above the new attic floor, a whole series of spatial experiences unfolds — from the closed to the open, from the dark to the light. A media museum is no black box.


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On the contrary, the spatiotemporal works here challenge the architecture as an opponent that lends form and support as explicitly as it does discretely, that facilitates a range of spatial experiences and that never becomes conspicuous in its surfaces and materiality. The openings in the inner shell can be altered in their relation to the windows in the outer shell. On one occasion this became the setting for an artistic intervention by Olafur Eliasson.

The building, which dates to , is a shining example of modern industrial architecture, combining as it does a reinforced concrete skeleton and roof structure of Polonceau trusses with large-scale elements such as the symmetrical towers flanking the main section of the building. Having served many different purposes over the course of its year existence, the building reflects how industry evolved during the 20th century.

Before it was used first as a theatre workshop, then as an engine and lamp factory, a production facility for corsets and mattresses, and by the metal and wood industries for — among other things — military purposes. G Conzen. Renovation work in strengthened the generic, flexible character of the building, while making a clear typological intervention to reflect its contemporary use as an art repository and exhibition space.

The spatial characteristics were revealed by removing small fixtures, exposing the skeleton structure and retaining the original staircases and steel windows. At the same time a modern roof extension where the company lettering used to stand updated the building in a way that clearly expresses its new use while also creating a connection to the city: from the ground the building is visible from far off, from the roof terrace visitors can look out over the urban landscape. Kuehn Malvezzi, founded in Berlin in by the architects Simona Malvezzi and Johannes and Wilfried Kuehn, has become a leader in exhibition and museum space design.

The work of Kuehn Malvezzi architects has been shown in solo and group exhibitions around the world, including at the German pavilion at the 10th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice. Kuehn Malvezzi was awarded the Deutscher Kritikerpreis in Celebrate exclusively in the rooms of an internationally renowned art collection.

Entrance is free of charge for children and young people under eighteen, school pupils, students, trainees, the disabled, pensioners, the unemployed and those on social security on presentation of a relevant valid ID as well as members of ICOM and AICA. Public guided tours in English through the current exhibitions on Saturdays, p.

Registration online through our calendar. Free of charge for children and young people under eighteen, school pupils, students and trainees. Barrier-free access to the ground floor of JSC Berlin. The first floor is not suitable for visitors in wheelchairs or for baby strollers access only via the staircase; no lift. In this spirit, it is appropriate that the collection has found a home in the former Czechoslovakian Cultural Institute, a structure that was built in the s and united various functions such as a library, a movie theatre, showrooms, and administration spaces under one roof.

Following the demise of the German Democratic Republic, when the cultural institute was closed, it was used for temporary, mostly cultural programs, yet it was never remodeled, thus making it a rare example of an unadulterated location in Berlin-Mitte which remains true to its original state. Many rooms of various sizes are connected in nested sequences, offering ideal conditions for mounting exhibitions of time-based art, but also required a new system to provide orientation. These spaces accommodate receptions and circulation. They encourage visitors to linger, to pause during their visit, leaf through the catalogue and orient themselves in the collection before they focus on individual work.

This is also where openings and public events are held. The furniture, most of which was designed especially for this site, supports these activities. The white curtain dims and softens the light without darkening the rooms. Instead of making comprehensive structural changes, an additional layer was merely added, thus responding to the requirements of lighting, clear orientation and exterior visibility using one single element.

The curtain gives the building a new identity, without eliminating the original one, rather like a new dress that can be taken off at any time — leaving the building open to change respectively to the collection and for subsequent use. In dialogue with its clients, it strives to develop new convictions. With a variety of projects, ranging from buildings in the art and exhibition sector to living spaces, office buildings and furniture design, the office examines the possibilities of creating new forms of living together and generating new identities.

The collection is thus a complex archive of temporalities, storing passed moments and layers of time that can be technically repeated, in principle an infinite number of times.

At present, over artworks by more than contemporary artists and artist groups across genres and generations offer an overview of time-based art from the s to today with a strong focus on works made after The term time-based art or time-based media describes works of art that unfold in time. Time-based art therefore encompasses all artworks in which duration is a dimension and comprises film, video, single- and multi-channel video installation, slide installations, multimedia environments, sound, performance, computer and software-based artworks such as virtual and augmented reality, and other forms of technology-based art.

These works are often allographic, meaning they are only visible when installed or projected. Bringing these fields together, the collection is unique in its heterogeneity, but certain themes still manifest across the collection, in works that address sociopolitical questions; identity politics; forms of narrative, fiction, and documentary; the body and representation; performativity and performance; the gaze; and the relationship between our built environment and the natural world.

The first large-scale group exhibition at the collection, Number One: Destroy, She Said —08 , was named after a video installation by artist Monica Bonvicini and loosely explored the relationship between interior and exterior, construction and destruction. Number Two: Fragile —09 focused on the body and corporality, bringing together video, performance, and body art.

Number Three: Here and Now —10 was dedicated solely to performance and the ephemeral, with performances and concerts by some of the most prominent contemporary artists working today scheduled all year long. Almost ten years later, Number Thirteen: Hello Boys —16 revisited performance and feminist video, questioning the representation of female identity and the performance document.

The title refers to the process of quality deterioration as data carriers are copied successively and, at the same time, to the social upheavals from one generation to the next. The inaugural exhibition in Berlin, Welt am Draht , addressed the influences and shifts in our social reality, identities, and environment effected by processes of digitalization. Another group show, Jaguars and Electric Eels , explored notions of indigeneity, of hybrids and synthetic forms of life, the migration of the species, and our constantly changing perceptions of reality.

Large-scale solo presentations supplement the collection exhibition program. In addition to exhibitions, smaller projects, talks, and ongoing screenings regularly accompany the program. Loan requests must be made at least 6 months before the desired start of the loan period. The request must contain the following information and documents:. Name and address of the institution submitting the loan request; name, function, telephone number, postal address and e-mail address of the contact person; exact name of the requested work; period, name of the exhibiting institution and location of the exhibition; detailed exhibition or project description in which the work is to be presented; a current facility report of the institution.

The conservation requirements for time-based media TBM have changed drastically over the last ten years. Initially the medium—specifically videotapes and DVDs—was the main focus of conservational attention. Just like any other materials, media are also susceptible to aging processes that in the long run can lead to damage or even the loss of works. Yet aging is only one aspect of the problem. There are also file formats and complex technical installations that are based on computer technologies or other hardware.

All of these components can age: not only the media themselves are affected by the processes of decay, but even the content can become unreadable over of the years due to incompatibilities. Technological evolution constantly results in new file formats and software codecs that are adapted in the production process of video artists. This is why in addition to the material-related risks, careful observation is necessary to ascertain which technologies have a promising future—and which digital platforms and formats are on their way to becoming obsolete.

To this end all new acquisitions must be thoroughly evaluated and documented to determine the exact type of digital format. The files are then transferred to a digital repository. This noticeably reduces the conservation effort since only a manageable number of formats need to be regularly checked and monitored to safeguard against formats that are becoming obsolete. This is flanked by individual solutions for artworks that do not support a standardized procedure. On a digital level, multiple backups that are independent and redundant give additional security, thus ensuring that the collection is preserved.

The media art-depository is the heart of the collection. Since fluctuating temperatures and humidity factors cause damage to videotapes and film, this was one of the most important factors during the planning. Temperatures of around 15 degrees Celsius 59 degrees Fahrenheit and 35 percent relative humidity RF are considered optimal for storing magnetic tapes and was therefore chosen for the repository.

These conditions are also appropriate for film and slides. They can acclimatize slowly in the airlock before they are moved to special mobile shelving for storage. The mobile shelving system, which is equipped with ball-bearing mountings, ensures that the space is used optimally. The floor has a stove-enamel finish and was checked for leftover magnetic charge to eliminate all risks for the stored videotapes. In addition, the shelves are grounded to prevent any static electricity. Since dust and air pollution represent a serious danger for media artworks, the air is filtered multiple times before and after the conditioning process.

Smoke and water detectors as well as an alarm system simultaneously offer comprehensive hazard protection. The elaborate technical amenities in combination with the custom mobile shelving make the media-art repository unique in Europe. Menu Stroke 48 Created with Sketch. Close up — work of the month. We look forward to your participation and your visit! Artboard Created with Sketch.

Cordial invitation! Group Created with Sketch. Artboard Copy Created with Sketch. Language: English April Edited by Julia Stoschek Foundation e. Size: 20,5 x 28,5 cm. Softcover with flaps. Language: German. Size: Hardback with colour plastic dust jacket. Sundays, a. During opening hours: Sunday, a. Outside opening hours: Cost: EUR You are looking for a special location for a celebration or a corporate event? We would be pleased to submit you an individual offer. Photo: Simon Vogel, Cologne.

JSC Berlin. Photo: Robert Hamacher, Berlin. JSC Berlin, foyer, ground floor. Cost: EUR 5. Contact: Christian Nickolai nickolai jsc. Group 3 Created with Sketch. The Dusseldorf School of Photography. Andreas Weisser Time-based media conservator. Jacolby Satterwhite. Katharina Sieverding. Manuel Graf. Christian Jankowski. Christoph Schlingensief.

Roxy Paine. Jeppe Hein. Charles Richardson. Wu Tsang. Relation in Space , Talking about Similarity , Breathing in, Breathing out , Imponderabilia , Expansion in Space , Relation in Movement , Relation in Time , Balance Proof , Incision , Kaiserschnitt , Charged Space , Three , There is a Criminal Touch to Art , Art must be beautiful, Artist must be beautiful , Freeing the Voice , Freeing the Memory , Freeing the Body , Helen Benigson.

Hannah Perry. Leo Gabin. Pipilotti Rist. Peter Weibel. Lutz Mommartz. David Claerbout. Matthew Buckingham. Matt Copson. Jen DeNike. Jacky Connolly. Ana Mendieta. Arthur Jafa. Vito Acconci. Colin Montgomery. Bruce Nauman. Art Make-Up, No. Cyprien Gaillard. Natascha Sadr Haghighian. Elizabeth Price. John Baldessari.

Christoph Westermeier. Sigalit Landau. Ed Fornieles. Thomas Demand. Jeremy Shaw.

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Jon Rafman. Still Life Betamale , Mainsqueeze , Erysichthon , Clemens von Wedemeyer. Big Business , The Making of Big Business , Mary Lucier. Paul McCarthy. Ma Bell , Painting Face Down — White Line , Spit — Not Looking at the Camera , Spinning, Short segment of minute Tape , — Whipping the Wall with Paint , Up Down Penis Show , Zippedy Doo Dance , Icicle Slobber , Pipe Shadow , Upside Down Spitting — Bat , Drawing — Semen Drawing , Spitting on the Camera Lens , Upside Down Pipe , Jesper Just.

Doug Aitken. Hannah Black. Adam Putnam. Nam June Paik. Joseph Beuys. Taryn Simon. Robin Rhode. Karl Wilhelm Diefenbach. Till Gerhard. Julius Shulman. Andreas Gursky. Richard Artschwager. Mika Rottenberg. House , Cheese , Hairwash , Milk , Concert , Chicken Soup , Brock Enright. Mark Leckey. Catherine Opie. City of Angels , Terra Degla Dea Madre , Terminal Garden , China Ring, unedited video notebook , Michael Snow. Lucy Raven. Klaus vom Bruch. Carol Bove. Ed Atkins. Jessica Mein.

Asier Mendizabal. Jan Paul Evers. Tobias Zielony. Anthony Burdin. Josh Kline. Monica Bonvicini. Frances Stark. Jana Euler. Christoph Steinmeyer. Timur Si-Qin. Joan Jonas. Chloe Wise. Chris Burden. Deadman , Bed Piece , Through the Night Softly , Icarus , Shoot , Thorben Eggers. Sophie Calle. Thiago Rocha Pitta. Barbara Hammer. Helen Marten. Rosemarie Trockel.

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John Bock. Im Schatten der Made , Pi-Bean , Seewolf , Lichterloh Roh , Monsieur et Monsieur , Nichts unter der Kinnlade , Martin Honert. Ian Cheng. Paul Pfeiffer. Anicka Yi. Rob Pruitt. Mathilde Rosier. Tony Oursler. Mike Kelley. Hito Steyerl. Patty Chang. Walead Beshty. Tracey Emin. Lynda Benglis. Moritz Wegwerth. Laurel Nakadate. Jack Smith.

Keren Cytter. Aaron Young. This deck is a wonderful reading deck and can also be used to study various meanings for the cards. Lenormand cards are a great way to find quick, concise answers to everyday concerns. The Healing Light Lenormand can expand your Lenormand collection or introduce you to this useful divination system. Code: OR33 Christopher Butler 36 cards, 88x mm. Code: OR34 Rossano Stefanin 32 cards, 88x mm.

Angelic energies are all around us and take many forms. The Angelic Oracle is a particularly sweet and light connection to these heavenly guides. Let these sweet and whimsical angels uplift you in periods of sadness and deepen your appreciation of moments of joy. Famous illustrator Jason Engle opens the door to a unique dark fantasy world.

Mausolea are tombs or buildings to house the dead. Through the wonderful and chilling images of this oracle, we can access wisdom shared by those who have travelled further than us through this journey of life and death. Cats are particularly good at expressing wisdom and insight. In the hands of talented Italian artist Paolo Barbieri, cats enter the realm of fantasy to guide us in our search for answers. This beautifully illustrated oracle deck continues to explore the Angelarium saga through the teachings of the Watchers. The Watchers are a mysterious race of angelic beings that descended to Earth in the early days of human existence.

Their wisdom and madness mingle to reveal insight about the duality of the human condition.

The Oracle of Watchers and the Oracle of Emanations can be used together. Lenormand oracle decks provide quick, clear answers to everyday questions. Add beauty to your readings or even begin your Lenormand journey with this engaging deck. Christiane Renner walks you through the mysteries of the world famous Lenormand oracle. She makes learning easy with diagrams and keywords.

Master the card meanings and the system and you will be doing practical, clear readings in no time. The Marseille Tarot is the deck most used and famous in Europe, since its beginning. This book has been built as a guide for the modern reader to approach an ancient deck, and tap to his timeless wisdom with clarity and depth.

Come from the wind: the new chapter of the immortal Druuna saga by Paolo Eleuteri Serpieri. Druuna was one of the most famous erotic science fiction comic books in the world. It now continues thanks to the new work of his original creator in a setting inspired by the Far West. Paolo Barbieri shows us a new fantasy vision, illustrating Unicorns as they never have been before. Size 21x28,2 cm. Size 22x30 cm. Size 14x21,5 cm. Size 20,2x28,2 cm. Italian and English edition. The Fantasy art of Paolo Barbieri gives us twelve incredible illustrations of Unicorns.

The visual magic of the artist shows these extraordinary creatures as never have been seen before. Shamantic wisdom, cyberpunk influences and sheer creativity animates each of these illustrations. The artwork of Jason Engle has no rivals into creating wonder through the darkness. Code: WS08 Size box xx35 mm. Inside: 1 metal engraved pen and 2 bottles of ink A metal engraved steampunk pen. Two ink bottles, one black and one amaranth.

A perfect box and an elegant packaging, suitable as a precious gift. This is for those moments when writing is not just a message, but an experience and an art. Code: WS09 Size box 90xx40 mm. Inside: 1 stick natural wax, 1 seal. The new travel set packaging is both elegant and practical and includes a red wax stick. Atanassov 78 cards, 66x mm. Artwork by Marco Nizzoli 78 cards, 66x mm. Burdel, Schaffhouse, 78 cards, 66x mm.

Alligo and Silvana Alasia, artwork by Silvana Alasia 78 cards, 66x mm. Engravings by C. Della Rocca, printed by F. Gumppenberg, Milano, 78 cards, 66x mm. Pignatiello and Luca Raimondo, artwork by Luca Raimondo 78 cards, 66x mm. Ferrara Master, ca. Atanassov, artwork by A. Artwork by Iassen Ghiuselev and Atanas A. Gina M. Pace, artwork by L.

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Raimondo, colors by C. Artwork by Walter Crane and Ernest Fitzpatrick 78 cards, 66x mm. Riccardo Minetti, artwork by Anna Lazzarini 78 cards, 66x mm. Madame Lenormand, artwork by Ernest Fitzpatrick 78 cards, 66x mm. Artwork by Paolo Martinello 78 cards, 65x mm. Hsu Chi Chun, artwork by Leo Tang 78 cards, 66x mm. Filadoro, artwork by S.

Ariganello and A. Pastorello 78 cards, 66x mm. Aleister Crowley, artwork by Frieda Harris 78 cards, 70x mm. Italian edition. Maria Caratti, artwork by Antonella Platano 78 cards, 66x mm. Pierluca Zizzi, artwork by Roberto De Angelis 79 transparent cards, 66x mm. Marina Roveda, artwork by Simone Gabrielli 78 cards, 66x mm. Giovanni Pelosini, artwork by Giuseppe Palumbo 78 cards, 66x mm, Instructions. Code: EX B. Moore, artwork by Grzegorz Krysinski and Simone Gabrielli 78 cards, 66x mm. Moore, artwork by S. Artwork by Erik C. Dunne 78 cards, 66x mm. Massaglia, color by B.

Nosenzo 78 cards, 70x mm. Artwork by Renata Lechner 78 cards, 70x mm. Artwork by Nicoletta Ceccoli 78 cards, 66x mm. Emanuela Signorini, artwork by Giulia F. Massaglia 78 cards, 66x mm. Artwork by Paolo Barbieri 78 cards, 66x mm. Riccardo Minetti, artwork by Paolo Martinello 78 cards, 66x mm. Carole-Anne Eschenazi, artwork by Alexandra V. Bach 78 cards, 70x mm. Jodorowsky, Philippe Camoin 78 cards, 65x mm. Artwork by Roberto De Angelis 78 cards 66x mm, book.

Angela Hartfield, artwork by Josephine Wall 78 cards, 66xmm. Conway, S. Knight, Lisa Hunt 81 cards, 72x mm. Watch the familiar Arcana as they come alive, and give a whole new depth to your readings! Ralph Horsley and Alessio Cavatore 78 cards, 66xmm. Hardbox, instructions. Magnetic hardbox xx50 mm. Dunne, Kim Huggens. Code: KIT27 B.

Moore, artwork by F. De Angelis. Dunne and Kim Huggens, artwork by Erik C. Moore, artwork by G. Krysinski, S. Gabrielli, S. Ariganello, A. Code: KIT35 M. Filadoro, L. Weatherstone Artwork by Davide Corsi. Wheaterstone, artwork by A. Mesar, L.

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Wheaterstone, artwork by C. Adriano Buldrini. Laura Tuan. Available in Uk and Pt OR Marcus Katz e Tali Goodwin, artwork by D. Katz and T. Goodwin, artwork by A. Tuan, artwork by M. Lunaea Weatherstone, artwork by Antonella Castelli. Lunaea Weatherstone, artwork by Nicoletta Ceccoli. Barbara Moore, Artwork by Paolo Barbieri. Artwork by Antonella Castelli. True reproduction of a deck printed in , instruction by Gina Di Roberto. Laura Tuan, artwork by Antonella Castelli.

Di Giammarino. Salerno and Walter Bruneel. Fairchild, artwork by J. Hartfield, artwork by J.